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Challenge : Design a more efficient chiller to meet the Center's target COP of 0.9 Challenge : Design a more efficient chiller to meet the Center's target COP of 0.9

  • Urban Development
  • Energy

Mr. Iida, Deputy Director of the Shinjuku District Heating and Cooling Center, set one big target for replacement of the new chiller: to raise the entire system's Coefficient of Performance (COP), the ratio that expresses a heat pump's efficiency, to 0.9.

In this video: Shinjuku District Heating and Cooling Center Deputy Director Isamu Iida explains his targets for the system's performance with the new chiller.

Two Ambitious Engineers Take on the Challenge

Mr. Yasuo Uraki of Hitachi Appliances was appointed supervisor of design and manufacturing for the new chiller. He had experience in supplying equipment to the Center in the past, overseeing the manufacturing of the aforementioned 10,000 refrigeration tons (RT) chiller in 1991.

The project team and I went through a lot of trial and error for that chiller. What we created remains to this day the largest such machine we have ever made. To the younger engineers who have never seen the actual machine, it's something of a legend.

Yasuo Uraki, General Manager, Large Tonnage Chiller Operation Division, Air Conditioning System Group, Hitachi Appliances, Inc.

Mr. Yasushi Nakamura is an engineer who would also join the replacement chiller project team. He had heard about this "legend," but when he finally saw it with his own eyes, he was amazed.

When I first visited the Shinjuku District Heating and Cooling Center after joining Hitachi, I was completely blown away by the size of the chillers and the new technologies in the steam turbine drive. It was truly a 'machine of legends'. This experience left me with a strong desire to take part in this scale of a project.

Yasushi Nakamura, Senior Engineer, Large Tonnage Chiller Operation Division, Air Conditioning System Group, Hitachi Appliances, Inc.

"When the time comes for the next replacement, I'd like to take on the task with my own hands," thought the veteran Mr. Uraki. "Someday I'd like to do this sort of project myself," hoped the young Mr. Nakamura. Driven by the ambitions of these two men, the project team was formed. They set out on a plan to switch the two old 7,000 RT chillers to four new 5,000 RT machines.

The Way a Chiller Works

So how does a "chiller" work to cool buildings?
The chiller generates cold water and supplies it to the buildings. This cold water is used in air conditioning systems to keep the buildings comfortable during all seasons. Here's a video that shows how the chiller produces cold water.

In this video: The inner workings of the chiller are explained.

Customer:
Energy Advance Co., Ltd.

Industries:
District Cooling Systems

Region:
Japan

Release Date:
Dec. 2014

Products & Services:
Air Conditioning

Solutions By:
Hitachi Appliances, Inc.